Author(s): Lynet Jenifer Dsouza, Larissa Martha Sams

Email(s): lynetlancy@gmail.com

DOI: 10.5958/2454-2660.2015.00030.7   

Address: Lynet Jenifer Dsouza1, Dr. (Mrs.) Larissa Martha Sams2
1Laxmi Memorial College of Nursing, A.J. Towers, Balmatta, Mangalore- 575 002,
2Principal, HOD, Department of Medical Surgical Nursing, Laxmi Memorial College of Nursing, A.J Towers, Balmatta, Mangalore -575002
*Corresponding Author

Published In:   Volume - 3,      Issue - 4,     Year - 2015


ABSTRACT:
Background: Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) is one of the cruel diseases that could either take the life away or disable person for life at any time without warning. Primarily, women were believed to have less risk in exposing to some modifiable risk factors such as alcohol, tobacco and high lipid food consumption.2 McCrae and Costa believed that preferred coping strategies depend on certain personality traits. According to Costa and McCrae while coping is not necessary a direct expression of personality, it is certainly influenced by personality traits. Other researchers have suggested that coping behaviour itself may be viewed as a trait. Despite such extremely controversial positions, it has to be recognized that both stability and change are present within the coping process. 3 Aims: The aim of the study was to assess personality pattern of coronary heart disease patients and the coping strategies during stressful situations using Cattell’s 16 Personality Factor and Coping brief scale. Objectives of the study: 1. To determine the personality profile and coping strategies among patients who are diagnosed to have coronary artery disease by using Cattell’s 16 personality Factor and Coping brief scale. 2. To determine the personality profile and coping strategies among non-patients group Catter’s 16 personality Factor and Coping brief scale. 3. To compare the difference in the personality profile and coping strategies among coronary heart disease patients and non-patients groups. Method: A descriptive comparative study consisting of 25 coronary heart disease patients and 25 non patients group selected by using purposive sampling technique was conducted in a multispecialty teaching hospital. Results: Majority (80%) of sample in the non-patient group were in 56-65 years and patients (36%) were in the age group of 46-55 years. The least percentage in the patients (12%) were in the age group of above 66 years. Majority of patients (60%) and non-patients (56%) were males. Highest percentage of subjects in the patient (40%) and non-patient group (36%) were Muslims. Highest percentage of patients (44%) and majority of non-patients (52%) were single. The highest percentage of the subjects had high school education (44%) and non-patients had primary education (40%). Highest percentages of the subjects (36%) were govt employee and non-patients (44%) were skilled and semiskilled workers. Majority of subjects (60%) were vegetarians and non-patients (84%) were non vegetarians. Highest percentage of subjects in the patients (48%) and non-patients (56%) were smoking. The highest percentage of the subjects in the patients (44%) and non-patients (52%) were performing regular excises/walking. The highest percentages of patients (52%) were having family history of cardiovascular disease. The highest percentage (40%) had<6month duration of illness. Majority of subjects (56%) were hospitalized with in the previous 6 months. Majority of patients (64%) had undergone medical treatment. The mean score of coping strategy using coping brief scale show that non-patients (97.32±2.135) was greater than patients (78.12±4.497).The mean score of personality profile using Cattell’s 16 personality Factor show that non-patients (588.72±15.931) was greater than patients (587.6±42.571). The data also depicts the range of score in patients was higher (154) where as in non-patients it was less (66). Interpretation and conclusion: Findings of the study showed that there was no significant difference in the personality profile scores (t=0.123, p<0.05) between coronary heart disease patients and non-patients group and also showed that there was a significant difference in the coping strategies (t= 19.295, p<0.05) between coronary heart disease patients and non-patient group.


Cite this article:
Lynet Jenifer Dsouza, Larissa Martha Sams. Comparison of personality profile and coping strategies among Coronary Heart Disease patients and non-patients groups in selected Hospitals, Mangaluru. Int. J. Nur. Edu. and Research 3(4): Oct.-Dec., 2015; Page 400-405. doi: 10.5958/2454-2660.2015.00030.7


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